Monthly Haiku Corner – December

Our theme this month will be dark and spooky Christmas.

bloody santa hat
a moment of weakness
vampire

Tuesday Terror – Black Sunday

Black Sunday (1961)
Sometimes Satan, with his capacity for doing evil, even plays tricks with the dead.

blacksunday barbara steele
 Black Sunday ©Kino International

After following in his father’s footsteps, cinematographer Mario Bava made his directorial debut with 1960 gothic horror, Black Sunday, aka, The Mask of Satan, about a witch named Asa Vajda from Moldavia, who vows revenge after she and her apprentice are condemned to death by her brother, the crown prince. Two centuries later, on Black Sunday, the day Satan walks the earth, a traveling physician and his assistant unwittingly bring the witch back to life. After turning her apprentice into a vampire, Asa immediately sets out to fulfill her cursed prophecy, by terrorizing her brother’s descendants.

 

Production started in late March 1960 and took less than two months to film, releasing in Italy in August of 1960. The film was a modest success, bringing in $140 million lire, earning back its production costs, but performed much better in Europe and the US. Despite being low-budget, Black Sunday was praised for its originality and vivid imagery, however, the gore and gruesome violence shown in the film drew much criticism and was even banned in the UK until 1968, when a heavily censored version, retitled as Revenge of the Vampire, was finally released. The uncut version wouldn’t be shown until 1992!

 

In the US, Black Sunday was shown as a double feature with Roger Corman’s The Little Shop of Horrors in February 1961. In order to make the film less objectionable, American censors edited the movie down three minutes, excluding such violent scenes as, the burning and branding of flesh, eyeball impalement, and blood spewing out from the mask as it was hammered onto witch’s face in the opening sequence.

 

Unknown British actress Barbara Steele was cast in the lead duel role of the evil witch vampire Asa and her innocent descendant Katia. Even though her voice was dubbed by another actress, audiences swooned over Steele’s haunting beauty and loved her villainous portrayal of the vengeful Asa. Barbara Steele reportedly had a hard time on set and gained reputation for being difficult, mostly due in part to the lack of communication and language barrier.

BlackSundayposter
©Kino International

What was once shocking to audiences of the early sixties, holds the same magic to influence numerous artists and filmmakers over the years, including Francis Ford Coppola, who is said to have recreated several scenes in Bram Stoker’s Dracula, as a homage to Bava, and Tim Burton’s Sleepy Hollow, which borrowed imagery, namely, the iconic death by iron maiden scene. The horrifying story of revenge and all its extreme violence and sexual suggestions actually helped Black Sunday become a cult classic.

Black Sunday
©Kino International

Sinister Saturdays – Vampire Chocolate Mousse Parfait

Vampires. Creatures of the night. Tortured souls doomed to walk the earth for eternity. No other archetype in horror has captured our fantasy like the powerful vampire, with that insatiable hunger that drives the frenzied brain in search of prey. From the dark corners of alleys, all the way to highest chambers of royal castles, bloodlust is their curse, and to that, I say… too bad, so sad, more chocolate for us!

The mighty hunter, the Vintage Kitchen Chef has created a decadent dessert worthy of eternal worship, Vampire Chocolate Mousse Parfaits.

Vampire-Chcoclate.jmousse1
Photos ©The Vintage Kitchen

Ingredients:

For The Mousse:
  • 4 oz Chocolate Baking Bar, White Chocolate; broken into pieces (or any high quality white baking chocolate)
  • 4 oz. Chocolate Baking Bar, Semi-Sweet Chocolate; broken into pieces (or any high quality semi-sweet baking chocolate)
  • 1 1/3 cup heavy cream
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • Black food coloring
  • Wilton rose icing decorations; optional
For The Edible Blood:
  • 1/2 cup light corn syrup
  • 1 Tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1-2 Tablespoons chocolate syrup
  • 1 tsp. cocoa
  • Red food coloring

For full recipe and instructions, please go here:
https://www.thevintagekitchenchef.com/vampire-chocolate-mousse-parfaits/

 

Like a stake through the heart, this recipe might be the death of you. But, that’s okay, because you’ll have a smile on your face when you go.

Wicked Art Wednesdays – Special Valentine’s Day Edition

Welcome to a special Valentine’s Day edition of Wicked Art Wednesdays!

Today we share the art of Toxic Toons’ most beloved goth couple from multi-talented artist and animator Eric “Unkle” Pigors. Romance is not dead. The people might be dead, but their love for each other is eternal!

i love u eric pigors

Continue reading “Wicked Art Wednesdays – Special Valentine’s Day Edition”